Promo-arte Latin American Art gallery
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2007.3/3〜3/13
JAMES KUDO EXHIBITION


2007.3.3〜3.13


   

"His painting has evolved to an abstraction that incorporates indecipherable drawings and signs that organize the composition, in a new and personal synthesis"

Art Critic Olivio Tavares de Araujo


Untitled F/2-32
B&W photography

28×42cm ed.5 2004



Untitled
B&W photography

28×42cm ed.5 2004

 


Four seasons
B&W photography
42x28cm ed.5/5 2004

 


Untitled-6
Acryl on canvas

100×80cm 2004

 


Untitled F/1-30
Acryl on canvas

42×28cm 2004


Untitled 44
Acryl on canvas

30x55cm 2004

 


Untitled-53
Acryl on canvas

50x90cm 2004

 


Untitled-8
Acryl on canvas

60x80cm 2001

 
   

 

Psychosomatism

In his fourth exhibition in Japan, artist James Kudo captures two years of memories in his paintings and photographs. In life we recount the past and observe what happens before us; here, Kudo somaticizes all of the sensory, visual, and olfactory experiences that permeate the physical and ludic space surrounding him. The result is an intimate manifestation of his imagination, transposed through the creative process.
It is as if his stray markings and scratches are the materialization of these ideas, resulting from a brisk visit to these archives of the past. They seem to recount and reaffirm the words of the Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who writes in his autobiography, メLife is not what we live but what we remember, and how we remember it to tell it."
Kudo often appropriates images and borrows stories from friends, recreating in his own way the time and physical space of these past occurrences. Based in Abstractionism, his completed works possess hints and shadows that suggest that their execution had been interrupted.
In contemporary terms, the gaze is still primary and remains controlled by the observer, who should complete or delimit the marks through an act of invasive construction, based on his or her aesthetic and personal perceptions; the works, then, are メactions provoking reactions.モ For the visitor, it is also inevitable that he or she will recall personal events and think of moments that have passed by quickly, leaving (or perhaps failing to leave) memories.
The artist seems to play freely with elements of diverse origins, such as rocks that he collected in Germany, which are the focus of the black and white photographs presented here for the first time in Japan. His natural lines resemble unfinished drawings and seem to demand realignment. Thus Kudo, by arranging them as if they were figurative drawings and then recording them through the process of photography, confounds the spectator with the mediums he uses.
In this experiment, there is no other sequence in which facts of the past, present, or future can be arranged. Kudo appropriates collected objects from distant places, produces them in his atelier, and presents them in another site, adding an atemporal element to his artistic production.

The search for an artistic meditation without territorial restrictions is nothing new to Kudo. In the past, he has worked with images sent to him by German artist Stefani Peter, who in turn did the same in a series of five photographs of predetermined sizes. What resulted was presented in Canada this year and in Germany in 2002 in an exhibition called メBetween Hemispheres.
With simple, suggestive markings, the artist prompts the gaze with a visual narrative, leading the spectator to his own recent and distant memories, whether reluctantly or in a spirit of aesthetic cooperation.

Erico Marmiroli

 


Untitled-5
Acryl on canvas

80x100cm 2001


Untitled F/4-33
B/W photography

28x42 cm 2004

 


Untitled F/7-36
B/W photography

28x42cm 2004




Untitled F/8-37
B/W photography

28x42cm 2004


Untitled-48
Acryl on canvas

30x40cm 2004

 


Untitled F/6-35
B/W photography

28x42cm 2004